Sit & See Training

The training to use the Sit& See Tool is a day training programme delivered in the organisation. The size of the group can be between 6 and 18 participants  The course examines care and compassion and how we show it and experience it for ourselves. Participants will learn how to observe care and compassion, how to record it and how to feed back to staff. The course also enables participants to learn, reflect and discuss care and compassion and challenge reason given about why compassionate care cannot be given, in a safe environment but with an experienced external facilitator.

On successful completion of the course the certified observers will be able to have unlimited use of the tool in their organisation.

Every two years certified observers will be expected to attend a one day update. The day will include reflection and discussion about how the tool assists in promoting a positive culture of care, how positive care and compassion is celebrated and how observers can use the evidence to uphold positive practice.

Evaluation of the training package

Dr Hazel Heath reviewed the training programme which was being provided between 2011 -2015.

This report summarises the evaluations of Sit & See training sessions through the first three months of 2014.Eleven organisations received training at thirteen separate training sessions.159 people completed evaluations forms from the various sessions. A broad range of organisations, roles and specialties were represented.

Organisations included NHS England, Primary and acute care & high secure services, Teaching Hospital NHS Trusts, Community NHS Trusts, Mental Health Partnership Foundation Trusts, Universities, High Secure Services, Care Home Groups and Healthwatch.

The findings

The comments particularly reinforced that the tool highlights the importance of small things and the ‘how’ of showing compassion.

Participants said the tool:

  • Reminded them that it is the small things that can make a big difference in care
  • Helps to give structure to aspects of care that they have hitherto found difficult to define
  • Helped them to celebrate compassion
  • Will be helpful in giving feedback to staff in positive ways and ways that would not make staff feel that managers were “getting at them”.
  • “Makes you reflect and observe practice in a more constructive way to enhance high quality care. Really useful tool to provide evidence”
  • “Reminds me that it often isn’t what people are doing, it’s how they are doing it that makes a difference”
  • “Reinforced the need to incorporate measurement of compassion within strategic management/Service Development and planning, and the need to celebrate good compassionate care”

How the tool will influence the work of caring in the future

Participants also suggested a range of ways in which the tool would influence their work in the future. Many said that it had made them reflect on their own practice and how they could change their ways of working in the future, for example:

  • Rethinking their skills in observation
  • Focusing on the positive
  • Enhancing their confidence in giving positive feedback.

The full report can be downloaded by clicking here.

Every two years certified observers will be expected to attend a one day update. The day will include reflection and discussion about how the tool assists in promoting a positive culture of care, how positive care and compassion is celebrated and how observers can use the evidence to uphold positive practice. 

We have an Advisory Board and I’ve explained to them what the tool is about and I want to train two of the directors who don’t have a care or nursing background. As directors, when they walk through the homes it would be really good for them to have an awareness. So that’s a personal mission that I think would be a really good thing and would help from the ethos of the company – from the very top.”

We want to look at the evidence from a team-based point of view, to go back to the managers and look at how the evidence can support them in supporting their staff in seeing what they’re doing really well.  I’m also looking at feeding this into our patient safety programme and I’m hoping that some of what we collect  will provide us with evidence to make changes through the patient safety programme.”